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. and united nations climate conference, the u.s. is told it's not doing enough to stop temperatures from chiming. china and india, and other major polluters want us to pay more. we're calling this a global money grab. they want us, they want more money from us. and here with the nrdc action fund. why are we the targets of-- why are we the villains here? >> well, stuart, i think that we're looking out for american interests here and this climate change is a threat to americans and we see that threat across the summer. the worst drought that i know. >> i've got the talking points, but this is the united nations, this is the united nations china is saying, you americans, you're the villains here and india saying the same thing. and china's the world's largest polluter. why are we the villains here? why is it the united nations is the vehicle to screw money out of us? >> well, i think that we need to take a global approach. it's a global problem and you make a good point. china is part of the problem, and india, japan, europe we're all part of the problem and take a global approach. stuart:
against the syrian people. >>> aid workers from the united nations and the european union continue to provide humanitarian services even after u.n. cease-fire monitors withdrew from syria in august. now officials have decided to withdraw their remaining personnel. they say it's just too dangerous. >> the united nations and syria will pull out non-essential international personnel with immediate effect. >> nesirky said any u.n. personnel who stay behind will be restricted to the capital damascus. eu sources said their ambassador and two other diplomats would be recalled. they say about ten syrian employees will take over information gathering and liaison activities. reuters says eight u.n. staff members have been killed since the uprising began in march of last year. >>> the iranian military says it has captured a u.s. intelligence-gathering drone in its air space. but a spokesman for the u.s. navy's 5th fleet denies that claim. iran state-run television network aired footage showing what it says is the unmanned air craft. iran's revolutionary guard missiles say it captured the dron
made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 243. the nays are 170. the resolution is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. for what purpose does the gentleman from connecticut seek recognition? >> thank you, mr. speaker. by the direction of the democratic caucus, i offer a privileged resolution and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 822, resolved, that the following named members be and are hereby elected to the following standing committees of the house of representatives -- one, committee on agriculture, mr. garamendi. two, committee on science, space and technology, mr. curson. mr. larson: i ask that the resoluti
with a one- day strike from newspapers. the united nations is warning food shortages are growing in syria as a result of rising prices and mounting attacks on un vehicles delivering supplies. the u.n. world food program is currently feeding one, 5 million people in syria, the vast majority displaced from their homes. the news comes after the u. n announcing they are cutting back and removing staffers from damascus. among the latest victims of violence in syria, nine students and a teacher were killed when their school was bombed in damascus. government forces have blamed rebels for the attack. nato has approved a request by turkey for the deployment of patriot missiles to its border with syria. turkey sought the missiles to defend itself from cross border violence. speaking in belgium, anders fogh rasmussen says the patriot missiles would serve as a deterrent to syria. >> i do believe that a deployment of patriot missiles will serve as an effective deterrent, and that way the escalate this situation along the syrian-turkish border. the mere fact that the patriot missiles have been deploye
momentum may be building for the latest move by palestinians. to get united nations recognition. david lee miller on what the u.s. intends to do. >> on the streets of ramallah, on the west bank. posters can already be seen exclaiming state of palestine, member of the united nations. before departing for new york, palestinian authority president mahmoud abbas told supporters he is determined to win a u.n. vote, raising the status of palestinians. to nonvoting member state at the world body. thursday's vote in the general assembly requires only a majority of the u.n. 193-member states and cannot be vetoed by the u.s. it was only one year ago that abbas sought full-up membership, only to be rebuffed by a threat of a u.s. veto with a security council. >> trying desperately to prevent that, to delay and threaten us. and now they understand that this is going to happen. they cannot stop it. >> the palestinian authority is frustrated at the lack of peace talks and the expansion of the israeli settlements. today, abbas met with the state department officials but failed to change the u.s.'s positio
are talking about the disco cliff. we are going to turn to advance in the middle east and the united nations this week. judy miller, joe trip be, and rollins. i wanted just go back to the fiscal cliff just for a second. that is, the republican messaging, if you will. they have an opportunity here, it seems to me, as well as a problem, but i don't hear creative, imaginative, if you will, rhetoric or language or positioning or messaging. >> we have been for about three years now. so i think there's no reason for it to start now. what house republicans have to understand is they are the republican party for the next four years and have to hve messaging and basically tell the american public what they're doing and why they're doing it. they can't be for tax cuts, for spending cuts. they have to articulate how it fits in the big picture. there are some skilled people that need to step forward. lou: would i be too cynical o say that perhaps the president has an additional advantage in this little carrousel of nonsense around the fiscal clef in that it also deflects and distracts from that half tr
.t.u., a branch of the united nations. and some want to give it new powers. several countries see the internet as a tool for political and/or economic control that they want to exploit. for example, russia's putin has openly stated his intention to seek, and i'm quoting, international control over the internet using the monitoring and supervisory capabilities of the i.t.u., end quote. and just last week, the syrian government shut off internet access as the regime sought top suppress the free exchange of information among its private citizens. but it's because the internet is the ultimate tool of political and economic liberation that we should foster and protect it, not give those who fear its impact on politics and the economy the power to repress its continued innovation and untapped potential. i also want to make an important point about our legitimacy in the fight to keep the internet thrive democratic and decentralized. unfortunately, we did undermine our credibility when the federal communications commission imposed net neutrality regulations without the proper statutory authority to do
, to the mayhem. >>> all right. other news, the united nations has overwhelmingly approved recognition of a palestinian state. that's a move fiercely opposed by the u.s. and by israel. however, in the west bank, fireworks went off and the celebration was on. the vote upgraded palestine to a nonmember, nonvoting observer status at the u.n. the palestinian delegation unfurled its flag right there on the floor of the general assembly. the u.s., israel, and allies oppose the vote saying it was all premature. >>> the american soldier accused of leaking a trove of classified documents to wikileaks will be questioned in a military court again today. private first-class bradley manning took the stand in a pretrial hearing yesterday making his first public statement since his arrest two years ago. manning wants his case thrown out, claiming he suffered unlawful punishment during his first year in detention. >>> there are reports of a settlement in a sex scandal that made international headlines. no details yet on the agreement between former international monetary fund chief dominique strauss-k
or the united nations jurisdiction over the init internet period. the use is in support of the web neutrality but the conference in dubai raises a specter of nations including iran, china, russia and others agreeing to live under the u.n. rules, what critics call restrictions. while the u.n. --. pardon me. while the u.n. maintains this is not about controlling the u.n. the critics say it is part of a red drip, drip regulation that will chip away internet freedom. >> even if internet freedom escapes this conference in dubai, this is just a stepping steen from countries like china, russia and other arab states they have been patient for the last 10 years and several years going forward they will continue to be persistent. >> reporter: the u.s. has a sizable delegation in dubai, about 1650 people. in simple terms they want internet regulation off the table and want the u.n. body to stick to networks already regulated so the telecommunications networks, phone networks but just leave the internet neutral if that is at all possible, jenna. jenna: we'll see what comes out of this conference. catheri
's because while opposed to her from her position as ambassador of the united nations and nothing could change my mind on that. bill: based on that answer it appears you are willing to take that answer higher than susan rice with it comes to benghazi. >> this will go down as the biggest coverup in history. they all knew it. they are hoping to have it go beyond the election date which it did. but people are not going to forget it. the administration deliberately covered this and misrepresented what happened in benghazi threatened up in the both of four people. one of whom was a good friend of mine, ambassador stevens. bill: the biggest coverup in american history. >> yes, sir. bill: when senator lieberman came out yesterday afternoon --'s listed as an independent. but he seemed to take more of a sill sill tory tone towards he -- he seemed to take more a conciliatory tone towards sue and rice. you wonder if this is a republican versus democrat issue. if that's the case, you are in the minority. >> that's true. senator lieberman is neither republican nor democrat but he's on the democrat s
the information that he gave before the united nations that led us into the iraq war? did that make colin powell unfit to be secretary of state or was colin powell given bad intel? i never heard him say that. i never heard lindsey graham say that. >> condoleezza rice. >> same thing with condoleezza rice. she gave bad information to congress, not just to a sunday morning talk show. to congress. to congress. >> how can you say these three people we saw on video, lindsey graham, kelly ayotte and senator john mccain are not jumping into an intelligence debate for political reasons because they did not speak up at other very key times, even perhaps more significant times in -- >> we get the point. i think we all agree. maybe there are people out there across america who are saying, you know what we really need, we really need people to fight hard night and day to sidetrack secretary of state potential candidate because of some things she said on -- maybe there's people out there. i don't know where they are because i've never met them but do want to know this. like what's their long game, willie? wha
about that. >> the only way forward is not meaningless theater at the united nations. the only way forward is to have meaningful peace talks, to engage for israelis and palestinians to try to solve the problems together. and that's what we're proposing. direct face to face peace talks. >> against this backdrop, the next opec meeting i believe december 12th is approaching. how do you expect the nations involved to respond? >> so far i guess with wti prices under $100, saudi arabia has achieve wlad it has publicly announced it wanted as in a price under $100. so right now i think there's very little scope for change in either production or actual quotas for the cartel. relative to developments around gaza, of course they're adding an additional layer to geopolitical tensions. but then again, if you consider the region, it is not a region that produces oil or is strategic in terms of an oil transit point. it could add to existing tensions. >> you brought up the u.s. fiscal cliff. what's the most important marginal factor at this point, is it u.s. demand, the situation in china? i real
different subject, united nations to upgrade palestinian status to a non-member observer state. clear slap in the face to the u.s. and israel and two of only 9 companies to vote against the new palestinian resolution. 138 countries voted in favor of giving palestinian the upgraded status and what happens now? the question, are we going to give them money for this upgraded status? let's ask john boulton, former u.s. ambassador to the united nations. he joins us on the phone. it's very simple, ambassador, are we going to be paying for palestinian? >> well, i think it's going to come in very short order, this vote won't do it, but, you know, this is part of the effort by the palestinian authority over the years to pretend that it's actually a state, and to justify more assistance, i think it will try and use u.n. channels more effectively to get money and may well join other u.n. specialized agencies now that the general assembly said it's the state. ab you know, israel and the state department have tried to play down yesterday's vote, but i'm afraid unlike a lot of u.n. votes which truly are
. >>> israel is facing a setback at the united nations as france is announcing it plans to vote for palestinian statehood. the u.n. general assembly set to vote on this day after tomorrow on whether to recognize a palestinian state. france is the first major european country to announce it will support the resolution and analysts say the measure is likely to pass. israel and the united states said the only true path to statehood would involve a peace agreement with israel. this week's vote will also happen against the backdrop of a fragile cease fire between the israelis and their forces and the militants from hamas. >>> workers cracked open the grave today of the late palestinian leader yasser arafat. it's all part of an investigation into whether somebody poisoned him. assassinated him even. he died in 2004. what killed him is still officially a mystery. israel has denied poisoning him at all. but over the summer, a lab in switzerland detected traces of a radioactive material in stains on his clothing. the current palestinian leader authorized this investigation to determine once and for all
done a great job as our be ambassador to the united nations. and of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president. >> paul: and the secretary of state hillary clinton reacting to talk to president obama may nominate u.n. ambassador susan rice to replace her. rice made the rounds on capitol hill on tuesday in an attempt to ease republican concerns and smooth the way for potential cabinet nomination, just one of the positions that president obama will have to fill on his national security team in his second term. we're back with dan henninger and mary anastasia o'grady and bret stevens joins the panel. is there a case for susan rice as secretary of state. >> senator john mccain and susan ayotte feel they have a case again her in relates to benghazi before the election because susan rice after the incident happened, that the murder of ambassador stevens went on the sunday morning talk shows and said that the demonstrations were related to the islamic video that some kid in california made. and what they want to know is why susan rice, u.n. ambassador, was sent out th
's not being done by the military. there is a whole series that legal questions coming up from the united nations and countries around the world investigations going on. we are supporting some of the bills that are asking for investigations. the dowell tap which if it can be proven may well be an actual legal war crime is there's a strike, people are hurt and i had a young boy tell me this story and it was very, very powerful. people then wanted to go to help the people who have been hurt by the drone strike, many of them who are innocent and they're afraid to go because those who are helped are hit with often what's called a double tap. the video we just released, 178 children, children have been killed by the drones. that's an extraordinary number and it's very clear these are not terrorists. >> they say anybody who is military age male, what does that mean, we're all military aged males, they can bomb this whole place it's considered a militant. we don't know if that's true, but the children are not military aged militants we know that those deaths are wrong and ron confident ahn talke
're an ambassador to the united nations -- i want to get your thoughts on this. she said, look, you go well beyond unclassified talking points in your daily preparation responsibilities. i guess the implication being that she would have been aware of other things that were different or contradicted directly to what she went and said on television. does this cast any doubt on her story? general clark has made what i've heard from everybody who knows her that she is an incredibly honest and forthright person. >> well, i think there's a bigger question here, erin, and that's the credibility of the administration on these national security issues and whether they politicized a national security issue that led to the death of four americans. i mean, i do -- i don't agree that the american people were not misled on this. i don't know how five days afterwards, a senior official -- first of all, i don't understand why susan rice was in that chair as opposed to hillary clinton as u.n. ambassador, she had nothing to do with what happened in benghazi. but besides that, you know, the issue here is why did the
change conference from the united nations still going on. what do you expect to come out of it. >> unfortunately, virtually nothing. look, we've been having these conferences for 20 years where all the governments of the world get together and try to promise to cut carbon emissions, but the reason why we can't do that is because carbon is the side effect of stuff we like. it's the electricity we have in here, it's all the great things that fossil fuels provide. stuart: what should be the global fix to the co 2 emissions problem? what would you recommend? >> well, fundamentally, as long as green energy is much more expensive than fossil fuels you're never going to convince, certainly not china and india, but not even the u.s. and europeans, that you need to innovate the price down and that's the solutions pretty much every place. >> we haven't got the technology. >> and you expect that? >> absolutely, so the point is stop putting up inefficient solar panels now. but make sure you get them to be cheap enough everyone will want them in decades. >> your judge is that a carbon tax m
this into an abortion debate is wrong on substance and bad politics. as to the united nations, i've heard people people say that ratifying the convention would take decisions out of parents' hands and let the u.n. or the federal government decide what's best for our children and that's just wrong. the treaty doesn't give the federal government or any state government new powers. with regard to children with disabilities and the treaty cannot be used as a basis for a lawsuit in state or federal court. former attorney general dick thornburgh made this crystal clear in his testimony before the senate foreign relations committee and in every conversation i've had with him. i would support the treaty if -- i wouldn't support the treaty if it were any other way. let's take a step back and look how this looks if america jeects this treaty. china has joined, russia has joined. we are the country that set the standards on rights for the -- of the disabled. we want everybody to play by international rules. we lose credibility if we turn around and refuse to participate in a treaty that merely asks other nations
. israel authorized the housing units after the united nations voted to upgrade palestinian status. palestine opposed the move. george hw bush in stable condition after receiving treatment for a bronchitissrelated cost. the 88-year-old has been in the hospital for a week receiving treatment visited by the children, including former president george w. bush. those are your headlines. back to lori and connell. >> thank you. >> sales numbers, general motors up 3% from last year, and others in the green as well thanks to, believe it or not, hurricane sandy. >> jeff flock has the story at the bureau in chicago. hi, jeff. >> indeed. two headlines. sandy one, and the other is fiscal cliff. starting to see the first impacts now in terms of considerations about fiscal cliff on the sales call today with ford keeping production up in the first quarter. they are bullish, increasing production by 11%, and gm holding off on sales forecasts because they are worried about the cliff. look at the numbers. as lori said, gm up 3%, ford up 6%, chrysler up, 30th consecutive month of increases for chrysl
and the united nations voted to grant palestine limited recognition of statehood. the move which falls short of independence gives palestinians limited privilegeds as a state including the right to join the international criminal court. dennis: lottery officials told a news conference after announcing a 52-year-old mechanic in new jersey and his wife claimed their fair share of the record $588 million power ball jackpot. mark and cindy hill, with two winning tickets. they found out she had the winning ticket. >> went by to see what the numbers were and got back in my car, is that the right number? i was shaking and called my husband and think i'm having a heart attack. dennis: can she avoid the lottery curse? they had that $580 million prize for whoever holds a winning ticket sold at a convenience store in suburban phoenix. cheryl: know what i related to our friends with. personal income and spending for october up 3% from last year, promising news for a company like eden with 130 locations it is one of the largest owners of shopping centers in this country mostly in the northeast. joining m
holiday season. 193 countries are meeting in dubai for the united nation's internet conference. new rules are being proposed. the u.s. wants to limit oversight which could be used by countries like china to restrict controls on the internet. they also want to avoid a situation where each country has its own rules, which would make it much harder for companies to do business across the world. dennis: it ain't going to work. it is a quarter till. time for stocks now. let's head down to lauren simonetti. >> let's talk about the healthcare sector. the hospital operator shares are up. announcing a special dividend. the third one. it will be payable by the end of the year. obviously, another company trying to avoid the fiscal cliff. also, let's talk hma. shares are down big time. you know the reason why. allegations that doctors were pressure to admit more patients. they call that report on "60 minutes" inaccurate. they expect more investigations going forward. big losers today. back to you. dennis: thank you. tracy: we are falling a little bit more. with taxes going up, tax-free muni bonds are
resolution the united nations general assembly that just passed. because it places further obstacles in the path to peace. we have been clear that only through direct negotiations between the parties can the palestinians and israelis achieve the peace they both deserve. two states for two peoples. they sovereign a viable independent palestine living side-by-side with a jewish and democratic israel. my longtime friend and colleague ehud barak is here. i knowed he would agree with that as both of the most decorated soldier in israeli history and as a distinguished public servants. i have more to say about this later, but i did want to begin by recognizing the challenge that this will surely present. i want to add my words of welcome to all of you. i want to thank bill for being here -- we reallyvery much appreciate your participation. foreign minister -- a good friend and colleague who is a top global thinker, well deserved because of the careful comprehensive views he has developed over many years of hard work about issues fundamental to freedom. of course, i see right before me a won
was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation. so winning the civil rights a precondition of winning the liberty across the globe. no i think looking from the outside if you'll forgive me, the same danger now. go to china and i criticize them for the lack of democracy. but they say yes, they are educating all of their people. in the middle east and i talked to people there on the edge of radicalism. they say look at the -- [inaudible] justices in your british and european and ame
and information to follow up on. the united nations and from a program says the burning of coal is the single most largest anthropogenic source of mercury air emissions, have a more than tripled since 1970. coal burning is increasing alongside at it -- alongside economic growth. this is from a report. there was a report done by the university of texas that showed a statistically significant link between pounds of industrial release of mercury and increased austism rates. autism prevalence was reduced by 1% to 10% from the pollution source. the background of the study was that during the time the studied by the texas team, they quoted the us epa estimating environmental mercury releases at 158 million tons annually nationwide in the late 1990's. when will -- are you aware of any studies other than this texas study that has a link between neurotoxic chemicals and the environment and increased rates of autism ? >> i am aware of other studies, for instance the one i mentioned earlier, looking at auto emissions and pregnancy early in life. clearly an association between that exposure and autism rates.
lands. stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. this is not about the united nations. this is about common humanity. and this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. please don't let captain brzynski down, please don't let senator bob dole down. most importantly, don't let the senate and the country down. approve this treaty. the presiding officer: the question occurs on the resolution of advice and consent to ratification of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. a senator: mr. president? i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: vote: vote: the presiding officer: on this vote the yeas are 61, the nays are 38, two-thirds of the senators present not having voted in the affirmative, the resolution of ratification is not agreed to. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: both senator mcconnell and i have approv
times." the united nations has voted overwhelmingly to recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state. shsymbolic victory that palestinians hope will strengthen their hand in future peace talks. both the u.s. and israel strongly object to the move, arguing that palestinians must first recognize israel's right to exist before gaining new rights at the u.n. >>> all right. harold, let's do "the l.a. times." >> i enjoyed watching him do it. >> i'm getting nervous. "los angeles times." a new study finds ice sheet melting in greenland and an antarctica, more than 300 billion tons of glacial ice are lost each year. the earth's sea level has risen eight inches since pre-industrialization times. >> that was a good read. you were overemphasizing a tad bit, but i like it. i'll give you some lessons. >> my posture, do i do this? >> you just want to be centered. you want to be strength, warmth, confidence is what you want to exude. you want to cluster some words so you don't bore people. >> i thought i was talking too fast. >> in my next life, i'm going to be a consultant and teach people how to t
council. after canada's chairmanship it will be the united states. there are only eight nations making up the arctic council, but the whole world is interested. china is interested in maritime commerce potential and the resources and the potential for a car rental catastrophes, which is very gigantic there as well. rescue missions, etc. what is the special burdens of canada and the united states with respect to the arctic council and should countries like china be allowed observance status? do think the next congress will ratify the treaty? if not, why not? >> the special burden, the role of the arctic council members, all of whom are democracies, one of the -- one of the underpinnings is a rules-based system. a respect for the rule of law. in addition to accountability to the people who elect you. canada has tremendous attachment and affection and over the largest part of the arctic. there are certain special obligations that come with that, stored ship of the environment. we have enormous interest in our own resources and our people. 40% of canadian land mass is above the 50th parallel,
of these foreign national students trained in these stem fields to stay here in the united states and help create jobs here in the united states. this bill actually goes a step further, and what it does is it provides them a green card, a green card, which is the first step toward a path to citizenship. if you believe that this is a self-inflicted wound on our economy, you're exactly right, our current policy. we're educating brilliant students and then compelling them to go to work in shanghai or singapore rather than san antonio or the silicon valley. meanwhile, we're handing out tens of thousands of diversity visas to immigrants chosen by a random lottery, without regard to any qualifications they might when it comes to job creation and entrepreneurship. it makes absolutely no sense. i believe we need an immigration policy that serves our national interest. and if there's one thing that we need more than anything else now is we need job creators and entrepreneurs in the united states. and we know in the -- in the global economy, it's people with the special skills in science, technology, engin
but the united states of america is held together by a great national creed not by ethnicity or blood or religion, our national creed is an aspiration will narrative that it doesn't matter where you came from. it matters where you are going. you can come from homeless circumstances and do great things and the only way that is true is if you have access to a high-quality education and if it ever becomes the case as it is increasingly now, as i said many times i can look at your zip code and the social fabric of this country has no chance to hold together and we will be picked one against the other and those who are capable and those who are not. those who are employable and those who are not. i can assure you that you might not be able to control your circumstances but you can control your response to your circumstances. that will no longer be the way americans think about themselves or each other and that gives way to entitlements. at core, the real problem for us in national security is not just our competitiveness abroad, the great national narrative, this cohesion that has made us the country
/11, 2001, and talk to a nations, of very international crowd and ask what they thought of the united states, admired the united states and they resented the united states because it that time they didn't believe there were any boundaries to what could be done. that looks at the united states as the most innovative place in the world, constantly pull rabbits out of the hat and reinvent itself. go around world today facie a nation constrained, tied down, exhausted, limited, militarily overreaching, economically--even talking to tim geithner, can you go around and tell other economies what to do when you're in a glass house? it has been real limiting. when you look at barack obama's first meeting with angela merkel in london when the global economy was on fire is interesting. she laid down the gauntlet. we are not going to play by your rules. we are not going to spend like you are telling us to do. it has been interesting as a superpower to look at all limits we have even influencing a nation like germany. and yet brussels i asked to you think america has the same growth we once had that could
are fighting against a national clean energy policy in the united states, guess what. china has a very, very focused and intense strategy. for example china's finance ministry announced it would set aside up to $321 million each year for clean energy electric vehicle research and development. just for those kind of cars. just for research and development. now, they're doing a heck of a lot more. for a closer look at what american electric car policies should be, we're bringing on lisa, the author of the book "oil on the brain," petroleum's long, strange trip to your tank. she comes us to from new york where she's a senior research fellow at the new america foundation. lisa, thank you so much for joining us inside "the war room." >> thank you. >> jennifer: all right. so let me get right to it because you're the expert. what is the most important public policy that america should adopt to promote electriification of vehicles? >> i think there's two things. one thing we should do is really make the cars available to p
american patriot. a man of common sense and decency. quite simply one of our nation's finest public servants. >> rose: today the united states face as wave of foreign policy challenges, including the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the t
in some sort of depth the various national security challenges facing the united states, and in the case, not only the united states but also the african continent. when you look at the area of responsibility africom has, it's so-ing, in terms of complexity and geography. many of you are well aware, at least this informed audience, that counterterrorism is still an issue the united states needs to take seriously. i think for some, with respect to africa, came to light with the tragic events in ben georgia circumstance but as general ham well knows, this has been challenging the united states and others for quite some time. the terrorist threat has metastasized. ding-dong, the witch is not dead, referring to osama bin laden. you see threats move and gravitate to un and understood protected areas. obviously al qaeda some the islamic maghreb seems to be on the march. they're spread and the al qaeda arabian peninsula, operating out of yemen, and one of these more or less undergoverned spaces. lots of opportunity but lots of concern. whether it's narcostates in the south, to huge challenges w
and national -- nationality act, to promote innovation, investment, and research in the united states, to eliminate the diversity in the grant program, and for other purposes. all points of order against consideration of the bill are waived. an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of rules committee print 112-34 modified by the amendment printed in the report of the committee on rules accompanying this resolution shall be considered as adopted. the bill as amended shall be considered as read. all points of order against provisions in the bill as amended are waived. the previous question shall be considered as ordered on the bill as amended. and on any amendment thereto to final passage without intervening motion except one, 90 minutes of debate equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the committee on the judiciary, and two, one motion to recommit with or without instructions. section 2, it shall be in order at any time on the legislative day of december 6, 2012, for the speaker to entertain motions that the house suspend the
to their countries to build those nations, and we want that to continue. we want them to come to the united states of america and go back to their country and foster democracy and good will. so many of them do that. but not all the 29,000 stay here. so what happens? you eliminate 50,000 visas. you say we're going to give you 55,000. you know you only can use 29,000. it's a net loss. the people on the other side of the aisle keep telling us, why don't they come through the legal way? why don't they come through the legal way? why do they always have to go under, around? they should come here legally. because we're for legal immigration. not today you're for legal immigration, because in the end you reduce the ability of people to come legally to the united states of america, and that is the diversity program, a program that allows. and lastly, let me just be very, very clear. . when we look at this and talk about the continent of africa, we think it's important that every continent of the world be able to come here and contribute to the great nation that is because that is the diversity in the grea
such as the united states that is accustomed to telling other nations to be responsible should on the one big problem concerning the future of the global economy show itself to be a responsible power. imagine that. china which we know doesn't play fair on chair or valuing currencies basically calling the u.s. irresponsible. and you know what? you can't argue with them. they are not wrong. our politicians have made it so a socialist government in france is looking to mimic us and a communist government is mocking us. take a look at the markets today. the dow jones industrial average had a burst at the close. it was up at 30 points
point. on your second point, the opec nations in being friends of the united states, i think the answer to that is that both sides have had a relationship that has been economically necessary, but i do not think the opec cartel conducts its affairs in a way to benefit the united states of america. they conduct their affairs so that they do not kill the goose that laid the golden egg. if you turn into the record on pages 8 and 9, you're asking for some visual clues as to what's going on here. if you look on page 8 coming will see the united states is paying about $20 million per month to import petroleum. you see the sharp rise in the line just before 2008 and then it sort of flat lines from 2008 going through the significant dip that was represented by the subprime mortgage meltdown. what's interesting about it is from that point forward it has remained about 50% of the balance of payments and deficits. that is because the oil cartel prices the marginal barrel of oil as what it costs to get it out of the ground and what the maximum is that they cannot pay without tipping the consumers o
been and united states and frankly other countries, that the nuclear-armed nation is working towards developing a ballistic missile that could be capable of hitting its neighbors or even possibly the united states. the u.s. sources estimate that north korea has deployed more than 800 medium-range missiles. going back to 1998 north korea conducted four tests of missiles beyond medium-range. all of those tests have failed. martha: this fox news alert for you because there are major developments in the blood di on going civil i can't remember in syria. new reports today of government jets hitting a town near the turkish border dropping two bombs on a syrian security building that was captured by the rebels. as we see the government fighting back in a fierce, fierce manner recent days. turkish first-responders say at least 11 people were wounded in that attack. so far activists say at least 40,000 people have been killed in this now 20-month-old conflict. bill: december 3rd on the calendar, america. 29 days until the nation's economy goes over the so-called fiscal cliff. the white house
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